TCT 2017 to feature restorative heart valve therapy discussion
30 . 10 . 2017

TCT 2017 to feature restorative heart valve therapy discussion

The principles, potential and development status of restorative heart valve therapy through Endogenous Tissue Restoration (ETR) will be discussed by leading experts at TCT 2017. Xeltis will host the ‘Restorative Heart Valves: Tomorrow’s World’ Symposium in Denver, Colorado at 7:00am on November 1.

“The potential to overcome the limitations of current artificial heart valves through a restorative approach in cardiovascular intervention is significant,” remarked Martijn Cox, Xeltis CTO and co-founder. “The numbers of patients are on the rise as a result of an aging population and the improvement of heart valve disease diagnosis,” he explained.

The satellite symposium will be Chaired by Dr Neil Moat, Royal Brompton Hospital, London. His co-chair Dr Gregory Fontana, Cardiovascular Institute, California, will introduce the session and current trends and limitations of tissue valves. The session will then feature Xeltis’ Martijn Cox providing an overview of ETR and the clinical benefits followed by Professor Virmani (CVPath Institute) presenting ETR histopathology results from pre-clinical trials. Professor Christian Spaulding (European Hospital Georges Pompidou) will present results from pre-clinical trials on an aortic valve enabling ETR before Professor Martin B. Leon (Columbia University Medical Center) concludes the meeting with future perspectives.

Learn more about Xeltis’ restorative heart valve therapy though this video and gain insight into how Xeltis is revolutionizing treatment of heart valve disease with ETR in this video.

Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) is a leading medical congress organized by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), taking place October 29-November 2, 2017 at the Colorado Convention Center, Denver, Colorado. TCT specializes in interventional cardiovascular medicine. It serves to showcase the latest advances in current therapies and clinical research.

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